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Barry Trost

Barry Trost

Job and Gertrud Tamaki Professor in the School of Humanities and Sciences

About

Born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Barry Trost began his university training at the University of Pennsylvania (BA, 1962) and completed his Ph.D. in Chemistry at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (1965). He moved directly to the University of Wisconsin, where he was promoted to Professor of Chemistry and subsequently Vilas Research Professor. He joined the faculty at Stanford as Professor of Chemistry in 1987 and became Tamaki Professor of Humanities and Sciences in 1990. In addition to serving multiple visiting professorships, Professor Trost was presented with a Docteur honoris causa of the Université Claude-Bernard (Lyon I), France, and in 1997 a Doctor Scientiarum Honoris Causa of the Technion, Haifa, Israel. In recognition of his innovations and scholarship in the field of organic synthesis, Professor Trost has received the ACS Award in Pure Chemistry, ACS Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Arthur C. Cope Scholar Award, and the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award, among many others. Professor Trost has been elected a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, American Chemical Society, and American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a member of the National Academy of Sciences, and served as Chairman of the NIH Medicinal Chemistry Study Section. He has held over 125 special university lectureships and presented over 270 Plenary Lectures at national and international meetings. He has published two books and over 950 scientific articles. He edited a major compendium entitled Comprehensive Organic Synthesis consisting of nine volumes and serves on the editorial board for Science of Synthesis and Reaxys.

The Trost Group’s research program revolves around the theme of synthesis, including target molecules with potential applications as novel catalysts, as well as antibiotic and antitumor therapies. The work comprises two major activities: 1) developing the tools, i.e., the reactions and reagents, and 2) creating the proper network of reactions to make complex targets readily available from simple starting materials.

Efforts to develop "chemists' enzymes" – non-peptidic transition metal based catalysts that can perform chemo-, regio-, diastereo-, and especially enantioselective reactions – focus close attention to the question of atom economy to minimize waste, energy, and consumption of raw materials.

Synthetic efficiency raises the question of metal catalyzed cycloadditions to rings other than six-membered. A general strategy is evolving for a "Diels-Alder" equivalent for formation of five, seven, nine, etc. membered carbo- and heterocyclic rings.

An exciting new direction derives from the molecular gymnastics acetylenes undergo in the presence of transition metals. Additional specific goals include cycloisomerization to virtually all types of ring sizes and systems with particularly versatile juxtaposition of functionality.

Palladium and ruthenium catalysts represent a major part of the lab's efforts, in order to invent new synthetic processes together with new opportunities for selectivity complementary to that obtained using other metal complexes. Main group chemistry, especially involving silicon, zinc, and sulfur, also offers many opportunities for new reaction design. Rational design of novel catalysts for asymmetric additions to carbonyl and imine groups are an exciting thrust.From these new synthetic tools evolve new synthetic strategies towards complex natural products. Targets include β-lactam antibiotics, ionophores, steroids and related compounds (e.g., Vitamin D metabolites), alkaloids, nucleosides, carbohydrates, and macrolide, terpenoid, and tetracyclic antitumor and antibiotic agents.

Appointments

Professor, Chemistry

Honors & Awards

Linus Pauling Medal Award, Puget Sound, Oregon, and Portland Sections of the American Chemical Society (2015)
Tetrahedron Prize, Tetrahedron Publications, Elsevier (2014)
August-Wilhelm-von-Hofmann Denkmuenze, German Chemical Society (2014)
Ryoji Noyori Prize, Society of Synthetic Organic Chemistry, Japan (2013)
Arthur C. Cope Award, American Chemical Society (2004)
Herbert C. Brown Award for Creative Research in Synthetic Methods, American Chemical Society (1999)
Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award, US EPA Office of Chemical Safety and Pollution Prevention (1998)
Roger Adams Award, American Chemical Society (1995)
Award for Creative Work in Synthetic Organic Chemistry, American Chemical Society (1981)
Award in Pure Chemistry, American Chemical Society (1977)

Boards, Advisory Committees, Professional Organizations

Editorial Advisory Board Member, Reaxys (CrossFire Beilstein) Database (2007 - Present)
Member, CAL/EPA Green Chemistry Scientific Advisory Panel (2007 - 2007)
Member, NRC Committee on the Review of Basic Energy Sciences Catalysis Program (2007 - 2007)
Editorial Board Member, Chemistry - An Asian Journal (2006 - Present)
Editorial Advisory Board Member, Beilstein Journal of Organic Chemistry (2005 - Present)
Editorial oard Member, Central European Journal of Chemistry (2003 - Present)
Editorial Board Member, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2003 - 2006)
Editorial Advisory Board, Journal of Organic Chemistry (2002 - 2006)
Organizing Committee, Mesilla Conference (2002 - 2002)
Editorial Advisory Board Member, Accounts of Chemical Research (2001 - 2003)

Professional Education

PhD, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Chemistry (1965)
BA with honors, University of Pennsylvania, Chemistry (1962)

Featured Publications